Art & Culture Travel & Tourism

Discovery of a 5000-years-old jewellery factory

 

The Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has made an important discovery by finding the remains of a 5000-years-old jewellery factory in the village of Rakhigarhi, Haryana, one of the oldest parts of the Indus Valley. Rakhigarhi is a village located in Hisar, Haryana, located about 150 kilometres from Delhi.

Rakhigarhi is one of the oldest villages in Haryana’s Hisar district and one of the earliest Indus Valley Civilization archaeological sites. Archaeological Survey of India(ASI) has uncovered many pieces of evidence and mysterious things of Harappan culture in all seven mounds of the archeological sites. Rakhigarhi was discovered by archaeologists in 1998 since then the place has been taken over by the ASI. The archeological teams discovered a cluster of seven mounds after 3 years of fine digging. The third round of excavations began in 2021 with four more mounds uncovered across 350 hectares which make the Rakhigarhi the largest surviving Indus Valley site. Mohenjodaro, covers 300 hectares, and was formerly thought to be the largest Indus Valley site in India.

The finds uncovered many objects during the excavation, the discovery of several dwellings, a kitchen complex, and a 5000-year-old jewellery-making factory indicate that the area was once a sizable commercial centre for gold and other objects. Copper and gold jewellery play a major role, which has been stored for thousands of years and has also been discovered. Copper & gold objects were also found, along with artefacts, beads, sealed scripts with motifs, & ceilings with Harappan script & elephant depictions.

Sanjay K Manjul, the joint director general of ASI said, “Similar excavations have happened before and this is the third phase here.” He added saying that “well-led planning could be observed there, with streets and walls along with it, house complexes, drainage systems, brick roofless buildings, burnt brick structural support and varieties of pottery components were the evidence along with many paintings showing their improved baking technique.”

Sanjay K Manjul also added a few points that our motive is to develop this site iconically. Archaeologists have found bronze and gold as well as artefacts, beads, patterned seal texts, and ceilings with Harappan texts and elephant depictions. This shows their cultural diversity. He also said that the people of Rakhigarhi may have been the ancestors of the people of Hastinapur.

Further, the number 6 and 7 mounds at Rakhigarhi were one of the 19 sites identified by the ASI to be notified as “sites of national importance”.

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